Tag Archives: classroom

While you wait for the soil to warm

As it gets closer to spring, lesson plans start to turn towards seeds and growing things (even if it’s too early to plant in our area right now). Here are some books with ideas for projects and science lessons to keep you busy!

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Building Birdhouses by Dana Meachen Rau

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Enchanted Gardening: Growing Miniature Gardens, Fairy Gardens, and More by Lisa Amstutz

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Fairy Garden Design by Alix Wood

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Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

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Fresh-Picked Poetry: A Day at the Farmers’ Market by Michelle Schaub

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Grow! Raise! Catch! How We Get Our Food by Shelley Rotner

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It’s Our Garden from Seeds to Harvest in a School Garden by George Ancona

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Karl, Get Out of the Garden! Carolus Linnaeus and the Naming of Everything by Anita Sanchez

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A Landscaper’s Tools by Sebastian Avery

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Spring on the Farm by M. J. York

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Super Simple Farm Projects: Fun & Easy Animal Environment Activities by Carolyn Bernhardt

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Welcome to the Backyard by Ruth Owen

“Look, up in the sky!”

binocular-387319_1920It’s a great month to be an amateur astronomer! Not only do we have a solar eclipse to look forward to on the 21st, but did you know that you can also enjoy shooting stars every August? The Perseid meteor shower occurs every August (near my friend’s birthday, which is one of the reasons I remember it!) and it should peak this weekend. I just made a display of some books about meteors, shooting stars and solar eclipses, but there are lots of great online resources, too.

The Adult Reference blog has all kinds of information right now about the upcoming solar eclipse. Lots of it will be readable and interesting for older kids. There’s an excellent roundup of online resources from Sky & Telescope magazine which includes a short, printable guide aimed at science teachers.

If you’re looking for something aimed at younger readers, NASA has resources especially for students as well as the NASA Kids’ Club, a page about the solar system, and Space Place (in English or Spanish). Space Place currently has an animation on the front page to explain, “What is a solar eclipse?” If you click on it, you can also download a poster with the information. You can find a link to eclipse safety information, too. Going beyond the eclipse, there is also information on meteor showers and how to watch for shooting stars. We will be trying some of the website’s hands-on activities at the bilingual Noche de la Familia program on the evening of August 21.

For information on the library’s eclipse-related programming and the eclipse glasses giveaway, please visit the special Eclipse page on our website. Please note that there is a limited supply of glasses. The teacher guide I mentioned above has instructions for other ways to view the eclipse safely, including simple pinhole projectors made from easy-to-come-by materials like cardboard, aluminum foil, and a pushpin.

If you would like to follow up on a family interest in astronomy sparked by this year’s eclipse, you might enjoy checking out one of our new STEAMboxes. The Astronomy Set has been popular and has several holds on it, but keep in mind– the Bird watching kit also includes binoculars! Janice Van Cleave also has several books with space science activities to try. You might also want to recreate some of the activities from the Noche de la Familia program with craft books, the Star Walk app, or music.