Tag Archives: graphic novels

New Indie Comics

dodo
Dodo by Felipe Nunes
Six-year-old Laila doesn’t understand why she’s pulled out of school and away from the rest of her friends following her parents’ separation. Now, she spends most of her time observing the park next to her house. When Laila spots a mysterious bird, a dodo named Ralph, the two form an unlikely friendship until Ralph starts to cause trouble and Laila finds the chaos around her growing. While cleaning up Ralph’s messes, Laila begins to understand the complexity of friendship, love, loss, and how to stand on her own.

kidb
Kid Beowulf: The Blood-bound Oath by Alexis E. Fajardo
Inspired by the epic poem Beowulf, Kid Beowulf follows the journey of 12-year-old twin brothers, Beowulf and Grendel, as they travel to distant lands and meet fellow epic heroes therein.

shood
Scarlet Hood by Mark Evans
Scarlet’s the new girl in town, having just moved to Norway with her parents. But a merciless bully called Greta the Cruel taunts her daily, making every day at school a misery. Then Scarlet’s grandmother gives her a magical hood that carries her back to the age of the Vikings–and a fire-breathing dragon. Kids will love this enchanting story about confronting your fears, discovering your inner powers, and finding strength in kindness.

The best new comics for kids

The Eisner Awards are going to be announced this Friday at the San Diego Comic Con. Here are the titles contending for awards in the two children’s categories:

Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 8)

Adele
Adele in Sand Land by Claude Ponti, translated by Skeeter Grant and Françoise Mouly
Adele sits down to play in the sandbox and embarks on a surreal adventure.

Arthur
Arthur and the Golden Rope by Joe Todd-Stanton
A boy sets out to save his village in a story based on Norse mythology.

eggkh
Egg by Kevin Henkes
Four eggs hatch in a cozy and surprising picture book.

gnp bnp
Good Night, Planet by Liniers
After being played with all day, Planet, a friendly stuffed animal, comes to life at night and goes on a moonlit adventure with a dog and a mouse.

Little Tails in the Savannah by Frederic Brrémaud and Federico Bertolucci, translated by Mike Kennedy (available through Interlibrary Loan)
A puppy and squirrel fly a cardboard box plane to visit new places.

Best Publication for Kids (ages 9–12)

Bolivar
Bolivar by Sean Rubin
Sybil is convinced that her neighbor is a dinosaur, but no one else in their bustling New York neighborhood seems to notice anything unusual.

Home Time (Book One): Under the River by Campbell Whyte (available through Interlibrary Loan)
A story from Australia in which a group of kids wakes up in a fantasy world.

Nlights
Nightlights by Lorena Alvarez
A new girl appears at Sandy’s school, but is she a friend or something sinister?

tdragon
The Tea Dragon Society by Katie O’Neill
A charming all-ages book that follows the story of Greta, a blacksmith apprentice, and the people she meets as she becomes entwined in the enchanting world of tea dragons (The webcomic is also nominated for an award).

wtb
Wallace the Brave by Will Henry
A story about a bold and curious boy named Wallace, his quirky hometown, and his family and friends.

An issue of Adventure Time Comics is also competing for Best Short Story.

Which is your favorite to win? Past winners have included favorites like El Deafo, Tiny Titans and Ghosts.

Animation, S’mores and One Dead Spy

tween animation

All Together Storytime
Monday, November 27, 9:30-10 a.m.
Monday, November 27, 10:15-10:45 a.m.
Monday, November 27, 11-11:30 a.m.
Enjoy a fun-filled half hour of stories and songs. This storytime is aimed at 2–6 year-olds, but siblings are welcome. Particularly good for families and groups with multi-age children. Drop in.

Tween Special – Stop Motion Animation Workshop
Monday, November 27, 4:15-5:15 p.m.
Grades 4–6
Explore stop-motion animation by directing a cast of LEGO actors in a movie of your own making. Register.

Diez Deditos (Ten Little Fingers)
Monday, November 27, 7-7:30 p.m.
Diez Deditos is a bilingual storytime presented in Spanish and English. Drop in.
Diez Deditos es una hora de cuento bilingüe presentada en Español e Ingles. Sin Registro Previo.

Lapsit Storytime
Tuesday, November 28, 9:45-10:15 a.m.
Tuesday, November 28, 10:30-11 a.m.
Ages 0–18 months with an adult
Join us for stories, songs and activities to help your babies grow and learn! Drop in.

Minecraft Club
Tuesday, November 28, 3:30-5 p.m.
Grades 3–12
Join us for open game play! Bring your Fountaindale Public Library card and Minecraft account information. Drop in.

Family Storytime
Tuesday, November 28, 7-7:30 p.m.
All ages, preschoolers with an adult
Gather the family together for a storytime filled with fun, stories, songs and laughter! Drop in.

Toddler Storytime
Wednesday, November 29, 9:30-10 a.m.
Wednesday, November 29, 10:15-10:45 a.m.
Wednesday, November 29, 11-11:30 a.m.
Ages 18–36 months
Help your toddlers grow and learn with stories, songs and fun! Drop in.

S’mores Book Club – “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” and Other Diary Books
Wednesday, November 29, 4:15-5:15 p.m.
Grades 3–6
Do you devour a book like a great after-school snack? If so, sign up for the S’mores Book Club! We will eat a snack and talk about a different topic each month. Register.

Minecraft Club
Thursday, November 30, 3:30-5 p.m.
Grades 3–12
Join us for open game play! Bring your Fountaindale Public Library card and Minecraft account information. Drop in.

Lapsit Storytime
Thursday, November 30, 6:30-7:15 p.m.
Ages 0–18 months with an adult
Join us for stories, songs and activities to help your babies grow and learn. Drop in.

Mini Movin’ and Groovin’
Saturday, December 2, 10:30-11:15 a.m.
Ages 8 months–5 years with an adult
Get your little ones movin’ and groovin’ to music, rhythms, songs and more! Drop in.

Saturday Special: Imagineers Club – Nathan Hale, Revolutionary War Spy
Saturday, December 2, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Grades 2–5
Play games, use new technologies and explore science based on a different book series each month. If you liked our Boo! Ha! Ha! program, this is for you. Register.

Remember to stop by next week with your family for

Holiday Memories Family Photo Day
Sunday, December 3, 2-4:30 p.m.
All ages
Drop in to Studio 300 and we’ll take a portrait you’ll treasure this holiday season. You’ll receive a digital copy to add to holiday cards and share with family and friends. Bring props for added fun! Drop in.

Will Eisner at 100

Will Eisner Week is an annual celebration promoting graphic novel literacy, free speech, and the legacy of Will Eisner, the revered comic artist and writer (1917-2005).  His work began during the Golden Age of Comics with the creation of characters including Uncle Sam, Sheena Queen of The Jungle, Black Hawk, and his most famous iconic character, The Spirit.  Throughout his career, he was determined to demonstrate what the medium he loved could accomplish, calling his first serious book format comic in 1978 a graphic novel, and then popularizing the format by writing 19 more.

Two of his works for younger readers are adaptations of classic stories in a comics format:

last knight
The Last Knight: An introduction to Don Quixote by Miquel de Cervantes
by Will Eisner

moby dick
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
adapted by Will Eisner

Will Eisner’s name also graces the comic industry’s Eisner Awards, which includes categories for

  • Best Title for Younger Readers/Best Comics Publication for a Younger Audience
  • Best Publication for Kids
  • Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 7)
  • Best Publication for Kids (ages 8-12)

The library owns lots of these award winners; give them a look!

African American History, Library History

march-9781603094023_p0_v5_s192x300

Something unusual happened at the Youth Media Awards on Monday.  A single book, March: Book Three (written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell), won 4 major awards:

  • Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, recognizing an African-American author and of outstanding books for children and young adults
  • Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults
  • Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children
  • YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

The book already won the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature in November.  You might have heard Representative John Lewis give an emotional acceptance speech, in which he recalled “I remember in 1956 when I was 16 years old, going down to the public library, trying to get library cards, and we were told that the libraries were whites-only and not for coloreds…To come here and receive this award — it’s too much.”

The history of library services for African Americans has included both exclusion and inclusion.  Here are some books (for a slightly younger audience than March) that help tell the story:

Finding Lincoln
Finding Lincoln by Ann Malaspina
In segregated 1950s Alabama, Louis cannot use the public library to research a class assignment, but one of the librarians lets him in after hours and helps him find the book that he needs. Includes an author’s note with historical information about library segregation in the South.

Goin' Somplace Special
Goin’ Someplace Special by Patricia McKissack
In segregated Nashville during the 1950s, a young African American girl endures a series of indignities and obstacles to get to the public library, one of the few integrated places in the city.

Richard Wright and the Library Card
Richard Wright and the Library Card by William Miller (also available in Spanish)
Based on a scene from Wright’s autobiography, Black Boy, in which the seventeen-year-old African-American borrows a white man’s library card and devours every book as a ticket to freedom.

Ron's Big Mission
Ron’s Big Mission by Rose Blue and Corinne Naden
One summer day in 1959, nine-year-old Ron McNair, who dreams of becoming a pilot, walks into the Lake City, South Carolina public library and insists on checking out some books, despite the rule that only white people can have library cards. Includes facts about McNair, who grew up to be an astronaut.

Gene Luen Yang

I heard some pretty exciting news the other day about comics creator Gene Luen Yang being named the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature by the Library of Congress.

He’s an author I mentioned recently when I highlighted last year’s Eisner Award winners and nominees for kids.  Many of his books are aimed at teens (including the fantastic Boxers and Saints— two companion books about the Boxer Rebellion– which I can’t recommend highly enough).  One of his newer comics, Secret Coders, is for middle grade readers.

secret coders
A new student arrives at a school where some strange things are happening (the robot birds are just the start).  Good thing this group of new friends is learning some computer programming skills…

When I was looking up the story I heard on the radio, I came across an interesting article about changes in who reads comics and how adults view comics for children.  There is a lot of good material for younger readers being published right now.  If you need some suggestions, just ask at the Children’s Services desk!

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Best New Comics: Eisner Award Winners and Nominees

Best Limited Series
Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland
Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland by Eric Shanower & Gabriel Rodriguez
“An all-new, all-ages series full of magic and whimsy from award-winning creators Eric Shanower (Adventures in Oz) and Gabriel Rodriguez (Locke & Key)! Spinning out of Winsor McKay’s brilliant early 20th Century strip, Return to Slumberland sees King Morpheus’ daughter, in the Royal Palace of Slumberland, selecting her next-playmate – Nemo! Only Nemo has no interest in being anyone’s playmate, dream or no dream!” (Diamond Comics Distributors)

Best New Series
Lumberjanes
Lumberjanes by Shannon Watters, Grace Ellis, Noelle Stevenson, & Brooke A. Allen (BOOM! Box)
Five friends attend a summer camp that just happens to be the home of yetis, talking statues, and other supernatural monsters. This title also won Best Publication for Teens (ages 13-17), for which it shared a nomination with The Dumbest Idea Ever, by Jimmy Gownley (author of Amelia Rules!).

Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 7)

Winner:
The Zoo Box
The Zoo Box, by Ariel Cohn & Aron Nels Steinke

Left home alone for the evening, Erika and Patrick discover a mysterious box in the attic, and when they take a peek inside the box, animals begin to pour out, turning their world upside down. – (Baker & Taylor)

Other nominees in this category:

BirdCatDog
BirdCatDog, by Lee Nordling & Meritxell Bosch

“Tells the story of a bird, a cat, and a dog through wordless comics. Everyone is a hero in his own story and every story is connected”– – (Baker & Taylor)

A Cat Named Tim and Other Stories
A Cat Named Tim And Other Stories by John Martz
In Tim’s world, a cat can paint on the ceiling and a happy pig couple can wait months for the bus. A duck and a mouse love to go flying, in a plane, of course. Every page is an adventure and each character is colorful in this collection of comics.

Hello Kitty Hello 40
Hello Kitty, Hello 40: A Celebration in 40 Stories edited by Traci N. Todd & Elizabeth Kawasaki

Featuring contributions by the creators of Babymouse, a 40th anniversary tribute collects stories and artwork by a range of comics artists, muralists and toy creators. – (Baker & Taylor)

“No one knows much about Mer, the underwater kingdom where Mermin the Merman was born, but due to a rising conflict with the people of Atlantis, Mermin is needed back home immediately. Which means that his human friends get to accompany him and see all the aquatic wonders of Mer. But once again, Mermin is tight-lipped about his past – even when it’s swimming right in front of him. And there are enemies lurking in the seedier depths of Mer who’ve got their sights set not only on Mermin, but on Pete and his friends!” –Amazon.com

Best Publication for Kids (ages 8-12)

Winner:

El Deafo
El Deafo, by Cece Bell
Based on Cece Bell’s own story, El Deafo tells the story of a rabbit girl making friends at school while dealing with the pros and cons of a large, awkward hearing aid. This title was also nominated for Best Reality-Based Work, along with Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales: Treaties, Trenches, Mud, and Blood, by Nathan Hale.

Other nominees in this category:

Batman Li'l Gotham
Batman Li’l Gotham, vol. 2 by Derek Fridolfs & Dustin Nguyen
Tales of adventure through the holidays featuring favorite Gotham City characters. – (Baker & Taylor)

(You can find more of the series here, here, here, and here.)

I Was the Cat by Paul Tobin & Benjamin Dewey

Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland by Eric Shanower & Gabriel Rodriguez (shown above)

Tiny Titans Return to the Treehouse
Tiny Titans: Return to the Treehouse by Art Baltazar & Franco
“Superboy and Supergirl return to the treehouse to discover…IT’S MISSING! Or is it just…really small? Who could have done such a thing?! Find out as all your favorite Tiny Titans search for answers!” –Random House

Best Writer: Gene Luen Yang for Avatar: The Last Airbender

Avatar the Last Airbender: The Rift as well as The Shadow Hero, which was also nominated for Best Publication for Teens.

Best Writer/Artist: Raina Telgemeier for Sisters

Sisters
Three weeks. Two sisters. One car. A true story.