Tag Archives: news

Comforting Reads for Difficult Times

candlelight

The Association for Library Service to Children has released a new list of recommended books called Comforting Reads for Difficult Times, which you can download and print here:
170523_ALSC_Booklist_ComfortingReads_FINAL_Pages

In addition to suggested books for different ages on topics like depression, resilience and violence, ALSC also suggests resources for adults. These books, articles and websites provide additional book suggestions and advice on topics like talking to children about the news.

New Launchpad SuperPacks

img_1530We recently added a dozen Playaway Launchpads to the library collection. Compared to the originals these are supersized, with 20 apps per tablet instead of the usual 10! You can read descriptions on the Findaway World website or visit our catalog to place holds:

Happy 100th, Beverly Cleary!

Beverly Cleary is turning 100! She’s been in the news a lot the past few days:

Here’s a feature from Chicago:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/books/ct-prj-beverly-cleary-appreciation-20160411-story.html

This piece from NPR has some lovely photos of the author and drawings of her characters:
http://www.npr.org/2016/04/11/473558659/beverly-cleary-is-turning-100-but-she-has-always-thought-like-a-kid

And this video from the Washington Post features messages from other children’s authors:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/video/entertainment/to-beverly-cleary-with-love-from-other-childrens-authors/2016/04/11/604b9624-fdaf-11e5-813a-90ab563f0dde_video.html

Be sure to check out our display for books about Ramona, Henry Huggins, Ralph S. Mouse, and more of this author’s favorite characters.

Which do you like best?

http://nyti.ms/1OZHqDv

A panel of judges recently named a list of the best illustrated children’s books of 2015.  Here are a few of them that are currently available at the Fountaindale Public Library, with our thoughts:

A fine dessert : four centuries, four families, one delicious treat
A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat by Emily Jenkins & Sophie Blackall
“Sometimes teachers ask us for a title that illustrates the concepts continuity and change.  This book is a great example.  In each of the four centuries, a child is helping a parent make the dessert blackberry fool (made with fruit and whipped cream).  While those elements stay the same, the technology and the ways people interact relate to each other change a great deal.”  -Ms. Sarah
This title is also available to download as an ebook.

Leo: A Ghost Story
Leo: A Ghost Story by Mac Barnett
“I read Leo: A Ghost Story by Mac Barnett.  It was funny, sad, and happy all in one book.  Poor little Leo lived all alone and got excited when a family moved into his home.  The family was not accepting of his presence and he left his home knowing he was unwanted.  While wondering the streets of a busy city, everything turned around when he met his new best friend.  In the end, Leo becomes a hero and he find his place in his new home.  ‘Most people cannot see ghosts. Can you?’ Great story!”  -Ms. Ashley

Sidewalk Flowers
Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson, illustrated by Sydney Smith
“This picture book is told only in pictures, no words. Mostly all the pictures are black and white with just some color pictures throughout the book. The young girl with her red hoodie is picking up flowers along the sidewalk and then giving them to various recipients along the way. I love the idea of this book about how important the little things in life are.”  -Ms. Nancy
This title is also available to download as an ebook.

Tricky Vic: the impossibly true story of the man who sold the Eiffel Tower
Tricky Vic: The Impossibly True Story of the Man who Sold the Eiffel Tower by Greg Pizzoli
“You can’t blame the author for wanting to tell this true story: a con man, Al Capone, a prison escape, the Eiffel Tower, Alcatraz… all great story elements.  The illustrations are intriguing, too.  The author/illustrator of Number One Sam and The Watermelon Seed uses an old-fashioned style with a few unique touches.  Most of the characters in the story have cartoon faces, but the criminal main character has a mysterious fingerprint for a head.  One of the marks, surnamed Poisson, has a fish head.  There are a few collage elements (in the notes at the end, Greg Pizzoli mentions using photographs and rubber stamps).  You’re not exactly sorry to see Victor Lustig caught and punished at the end, but the character is a con man and he does make you want to like him.” -Ms. Sarah