Tag Archives: picture books

Remembering James Stevenson

You might know the work of James Stevenson whether you are a child or a grown-up. He was a cartoonist at the New Yorker for many years. He also illustrated books for children, including his own stories and poetry, poetry by Jack Prelutsky, and stories about “The Pain and the Great One” by Judy Blume. We would be happy to help you find his work in our collection or place a hold on titles available at another library.

Foxes are the new owls

Ever since the popular chapter book Pax was published, we’ve been seeing lots of books about foxes!  Here are some new picture books and nonfiction titles:

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All Ears, All Eyes
by Richard Jackson; illustrated by Katherine Tillotson
As darkness falls in the forest, animals hoot, chirp, whirr, and bark, lulling drowsy children to sleep.

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Faraway Fox
by Jolene Thompson illustrated by Justin K. Thompson
A lonely fox roams the forest where he grew up, searching for his family and finding only strange creatures who stand on their hind legs, until, at last, he finds himself at home.

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How to Find a Fox
by Nilah Magruder
Equipped with a camera and determination, an adventurous little girl tries to track down an elusive red fox, which proves more difficult than she thought.

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Little Fox in the Forest
by Stephanie Graegin
A wordless picture book in which two friends follow a young fox deep into the woods and discover a wondrous and magical world.

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Pandora
by Victoria Turnbull
Pandora the fox lives alone in a junk yard. She’s depressed and has no contact with the outside world. Then, she rescues a blue bird. As she nurses him back to health, the bird collects seeds and trinkets for her. One day, the bird grows strong enough to fly away, but the garden seeds he brought begin to transform Pandora’s landscape.

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Watersong
by Tim McCanna; illustrated by Richard Smythe
A fox’s journey to take shelter from a rainstorm, told entirely in onomatopoeia.

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The Secret Life of the Red Fox by Laurence Pringle; illustrated by Kate Garchinsky
The life of a red fox is a mystery to most people. You might catch a glimpse of blazing red fur or hear a far-off bard, but the fox‘s daily activities are know to few. Filled with fascinating facts and illuminating details, this nonfiction book invites readers on a yearlong journey with a red fox named Vixen.

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Sniffer and Tinni: A True Tale of Amazing Animal Friendship
by Berit Helberg; photography by Torgeir Berge
A fox and a German Shepherd living in a small Norwegian town become best friends.

Rescue Cats

Did you know that two Fountaindale librarians volunteer at the animal shelter, taking care of cats? Here are some new stories about rescuing and bringing home cats and kittens.

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Big Cat, Little Cat by Elisha Cooper
A moving tale about friendship, new beginnings, and cats.

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A Cat Named Swan by Holly Hobbie
After surviving on the streets, a homeless cat discovers the joys of living with a human family.

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Cat on the Bus by Aram Kim
Using onomatopoeia, this almost wordless story tells of a homeless cat who finds shelter on a bus where she meets a cat-loving Asian grandfather.

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Little Night Cat by Sonja Danowski
When Tony, a little boy, bravely offers his stuffed animals–including his favorite toy cat–to the animal shelter to raise money for the needy dogs and cats, it touches his mom’s heart. Later that night when Tony misses his toy, she gives him her old stuffed cat. He embraces it with such care and devotion that his mom rewards him in a way that he never imagines.

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Lola Gets a Cat by Anna McQuinn; illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw
More than anything Lola would like a cat, but first she must learn how to care for it.

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Lost and Found Cat: The True Story of Kunkush’s Incredible Journey by Doug Kuntz and Amy Shrodes; illustrated by Sue Cornelison
A family of refugees is accidentally separated from, and then reunited with, their pet cat.

Little Golden Books

Little Golden Books are turning 75 this year!  Here are some memories of Little Golden Books from different library staff:

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The Little Golden Book I remember best from my childhood is The Monster at the End of this Book (featuring Grover from Sesame Street).  What I loved about this book:

  • I loved Sesame Street
  • It’s the first thing I remember that broke the fourth wall
  • Like Mo Willem’s pigeon books, it puts the child in control

-Ms. Sarah

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I remember getting The Poky Little Puppy for my birthday. We did not have many books or toys and I remember carrying this book everywhere. It is still my most treasured picture book from childhood.

-Ms. Rupa

I am not as old as the Little Golden Books, but when I was a girl I had a number of them on the bookshelf in my room, and I read them again and again.

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We always had a garden in our backyard, so I treasured Two Little Gardeners by Margaret Wise Brown and Edith Thacher Hurd because it described the gardening year that I knew in loving detail. Gertrude Elliott’s illustrations provided even more detail, adding insects and birds, frogs, turtles, and little critters for the observant child to discover. One of my favorite pages was a cutaway view of the garden showing the baby beets, carrots, and potatoes growing underground surrounded by wormholes, rocks, and the roots of other plants.

The two gardening children watched the seedlings sprout. They watched the plants bloom and the bees pollinate. They hoed the weeds and watered “the rows…Till the dusty dirt was all dark and damp and wet.” When the plants were attacked by crows and animals, they added a scarecrow and a “raba-mole” to fend them off. And, oh, the results were splendid! “Day after day something was ripe and ready to pick.” Just like my family’s garden.

At the story’s end there was a great feast, a bountiful harvest of vegetables stored in bins and tubs of sand, and rows of jewel-like canned goods on the cellar shelves. A song on the last page summed it all up.

Hi Diddle diddle, We’re full as a fiddle

      Of things that come out of the ground.

      What we plant in the spring

      We eat in the fall

      And put up in jars

      And eat it all

      When the snow come falling down.

Time to buy some seed packets and go out to hoe!

-Ms. Wendy

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Between the years 1990 and 1999 I worked at Western Publishing Company during which time it was sold and renamed Golden Books Publishing in Racine, WI.  While I was there I worked in three different departments; Order Processing, the Wal-Mart Team and Special Markets.  After Western Publishing was sold the new owners built a new facility a few miles away in Sturtevant, WI.  It was beautiful, and printing and production was just a catwalk away from the business side of the company.  One could walk over and look down through large windows onto the floor where the printing, production and packaging was going on.  I have always loved reading and the opportunity to work for a company that published one of the most well-known children’s book brand, Little Golden Books, was a great privilege. Now as a cataloger I reminisce each time a Golden Book comes across my desk.  It’s exciting to be on the other side of the process, bringing the items into the library where Patrons can come in and enjoy these wonderfully created books.  Some of my favorite books are The Poky Little Puppy, Prayers for Children, The Sailor Dog, Where Do Kisses Come From, and all the ones that are illustrated by Eloise Wilkin.

-Ms. Penny S., who gets our new books ready for the shelves

For more on the history of Little Golden Books, check out this book in the adult collection:

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Golden Legacy: How Golden Books Won Children’s Hearts, Changed Publishing Forever, and Became an American Icon along the Way by Leonard S. Marcus

New Spanish books and new Spanish blog

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Thanks to a tip from a wonderful teacher, we were able to stop at a local book fair and pick up a box full of great new children’s books in Spanish!  They will be added to the collection soon.  If you would like to stay up-to-date on library programs and new books in Spanish, check out Fountaindale’s new OYE blog.  This Spanish language blog will have information for children and adults on library services, events, and new items in our collection.

Love Stories

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Heart to Heart by Lois Ehlert
Alphabet letters and bold, graphic images of fruits and vegetables come together in this book of pun-filled rebuses about love and friendship.

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I Heart You by Meg Fleming; illustrated by Sarah Jane Wright
A rhyming picture book about the loving parent-child relationship in animal and human families

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I Will Love You Anyway by Mick Inkpen; illustrated by Chloe Inkpen
Dog is very badly behaved; he destroys everything, chases cars, rolls in poo, and won’t stop running away! But when he finds himself lost and alone there is one person he knows he can always count on.

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Pete Likes Bunny by Emily Arnold McCully
Pete likes Bunny, the new girl in his class; and despite teasing from classmates, Bunny likes Pete too.

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Psst! I Love You by Marjorie Blain Parker; illustrated by Sydney Hanson
Celebrates the love between parents and children of every species. In lilting rhyme, the book introduces toddlers to an array of super-adorable animal parents and babies, including cows, horses, sheep, cats, owls, ducks, roosters, and, of course humans. What do they all say to each other? I LOVE YOU! This is the perfect read-aloud and goodnight story.

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The Secret Life of Squirrels: A Love Story by Nancy Rose
Mr. Peanuts, a most unusual squirrel, is lonely as Valentine’s Day nears but he meets Rosie in the bookstore and soon they are nuts about each other.

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What Do You Love About You? by Karen Lechelt
Different animals show there is a lot to love about each of us.

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When an Elephant Falls in Love by Davide Cali; illustrations by Alice Lotti
When an elephant falls in love, he does many foolish things, and never tells her how he feels–until one day the doorbell rings.

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XO, OX: A Love Story by Adam Rex; illustrated by Scott Campbell
The hilarious tale of an ox who is in love with a gazelle, told in correspondence

Quick Pick: The Tree in the Courtyard

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The Tree in the Courtyard: Looking Through Anne Frank’s Window by Jeff Gottesfeld, illustrated by Peter McCarty

“The tree in the courtyard was a horse chestnut. Her leaves were green stars; her flowers foaming cones of white and pink. Seagulls flocked to her shade. She spread roots and reached skyward in peace.

“The tree watched a little girl, who played and laughed and wrote in a diary. When strangers invaded the city and warplanes roared overhead, the tree watched the girl peek out of the curtained window of the annex. It watched as she and her family were taken away—and when her father returned after the war, alone.

“The tree died the summer Anne Frank would have turned eighty-one, but its seeds and saplings have been planted around the world as a symbol of peace. Its story, and Anne’s story, are beautifully told and illustrated in this powerful picture book.” -Random House

Tu Bi-Shevat (also spelled Tu Bishvat or Tu B’Shevat) is a Jewish holiday sometimes called the New Year of the Trees or “Jewish Arbor Day.” This year it begins at sundown on February 10. It is a time to appreciate trees (and plant them, if you live where the climate is right at this time of year). You can click on links above to see other stories and information about the holiday in our collection.