Finale to February

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Storytimes
, Minecraft Club (on Tuesday and Thursday), and Crazy 8s continue this week.

Great Read Harry Potter Art Exhibit
Tuesday, February 28, 5:30-6 p.m.
All ages; preschoolers with an adult

Each Great Read participating library’s Adult, Teen and Child art contest winners will have their work on display in Meeting Room B, with awards given in Meeting Room A beginning at 6:00 p.m. Come join us to celebrate the artistic talent and spirit! Drop in.

Great Read Finale: Hogwarts Magic Show
Tuesday, February 28, 6-7:30 p.m.
All ages; preschoolers with an adult

Celebrate the Great Read‘s Art Contest winners with an award ceremony at 6:00 PM, and then join us for a magic show! Learn firsthand about the Magic of Hogwarts during a special Harry Potter-themed magic show. Children and their parents will be amazed at the magic of “Professor Gerry Potter.” Professor Potter is the 7th cousin (twice removed) of the famous Harry Potter, and a direct descendant of Godric of the House of Gryffindor. This fast-paced show features comedy magic and lots of audience participation. Muggles of all ages will learn firsthand about the magic of the Marauder’s Map and discover the power of Polyjuice Potion. Audience members are encouraged dress in their favorite wizard or witch outfit, and be prepared to cast their own spells during this family-friendly show. Drop in until the limit of the room is reached.

Bits & Bytes Coding Club
Wednesday, March 1, 3:30-5 p.m.
Grades 4-12
Join our new coding club! Learn programming while working on cool projects. This club is intended for Fountaindale cardholders and residents. Drop in until the program limit of 16 participants is reached.

Let’s Create
Wednesday, March 1, 4:15-5:15 p.m.
Grades K-5
Friends get together after school to make a craft and share a special time! Drop in.

Visit the new Outreach Preschool page for Thursday morning storytime information.

Arts & Fables
Friday, March 3
9:30-10:15 or 10:30-11:15 a.m.
Ages 2-6 years with an adult
Hear a story, then make a craft about it! What a great way to spend some time at the library in the morning! Drop in until the room is full.

Mini Movin’ and Groovin’
Saturday, March 4, 10:30-11:15 a.m.
All ages
Join our group of friends for great times with music, rhythm, songs and fun! Drop in until the limit of the room is reached.

Saturday Special: Boo! Ha! Ha!
Saturday, March 4, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Grades 2-5
Program based on the funny Timmy Failure book series where gullible detectives are invited to successfully carry out a no-brainer spy mission. Register now.

African American History Biographies, part 2

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Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat by Javaka Steptoe
Jean-Michael Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocked to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art work had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games and in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City. Now, award-winning illustrator Javaka Steptoe’s vivid text and bold artwork echoing Basquiat’s own introduce young readers to the powerful message and art doesn’t always have to be neat or clean–and definitely not inside the lines–to be beautiful.
(If you’re not sure you know his work, that painting being hung at the end of the last episode of Luke Cage is a Basquiat.)
The stickers on the cover indicate that artist Javaka Steptoe (whose father has his own award named after him) won the Caldecott Medal and was the 2017 Coretta Scott King Book Awards Illustrator Winner.

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A Spy Called James: The True Story of James Lafayette, Revolutionary War Double Agent by Anne Rockwell; illustrated by Floyd Cooper
The true story of James Lafayette, a slave who spied for George Washington’s army during the American Revolution. But while America celebrated its newfound freedom, James returned to slavery. His service hadn’t qualified him for the release he’d been hoping for. For James the fight wasn’t over; he’d already helped his country gain its freedom, now it was time to win his own.

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Step Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World about Kindness by Donna Janell Bowman; illustrated by Daniel Minter
A picture book biography of Dr. William Key, a former slave and self-trained veterinarian who taught his horse, Jim, to read and write and who together with Jim became one of the most famous traveling performance acts around the turn of the twentieth century.

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Strong Inside: The True Story of How Perry Wallace Broke College Basketball’s Color Line by Andrew Maraniss
Perry Wallace was born at an historic crossroads in U.S. history. He entered kindergarten the year that the Brown v. Board of Education decision led to integrated schools, allowing blacks and whites to learn side by side. A week after Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, Wallace enrolled in high school and his sensational jumping, dunking, and rebounding abilities quickly earned him the attention of college basketball recruiters from top schools across the nation. In his senior year his Pearl High School basketball team won Tennessee’s first racially-integrated state tournament. The world seemed to be opening up at just the right time, and when Vanderbilt University recruited Wallace to play basketball, he courageously accepted the assignment to desegregate the Southeastern Conference. The hateful experiences he would endure on campus and in the hostile gymnasiums of the Deep South turned out to be the stuff of nightmares. Yet Wallace persisted, endured, and met this unthinkable challenge head on. This insightful biography digs deep beneath the surface to reveal a complicated, profound, and inspiring story of an athlete turned civil rights trailblazer.

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Tiny Stitches: The Life of Medical Pioneer Vivien Thomas by Gwendolyn Hooks; illustrated by Colin Bootman
Biography of Vivien Thomas, an African-American surgical technician who pioneered the procedure used to treat babies with a heart defect known as ‘blue baby syndrome.’

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Whoosh! Lonnie Johnson’s Super-Soaking Stream of Inventions by Chris Barton; illustrated by Don Tate
Chronicles the life and achievements of the NASA engineer and inventor, from his childhood to his accidental invention of the Super Soaker water gun.

Remembering a poet

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A Girl Called Vincent: The Life of Poet Edna St. Vincent Millay by Krystyna Poray Goddu

125 years ago, in 1892, poet Edna St. Vincent Millay was born.  2017 also marks 100 years since her first book of poetry was published.  She is especially remembered for her love poems for adults, but a few of her works are included in our children’s poetry collections.

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A Family of Poems includes “First Fig” (which starts with the famous line, “My candle burns at both ends”) and “Second Fig” (neither of which is about figs).

Sing a Song of Popcorn: Every Child’s Book of Poems includes “From a Very Little Sphinx.”

Singing America: Poems that Define a Nation includes “Counting Out Rhyme,” which describes trees in lyrical language.

The poem of hers I remember best is The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver, which I first read in high school when I was just learning to play the harp.

 

 

 

Pizza, Preschool, and Pete the Cat

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Storytimes and Minecraft Club (on Tuesday and Thursday) continue this week.

Harry Potter Family STEAM Workshop
Monday, February 20, 2-4 p.m.
Grades K-5, K with an adult
Explore our STEAM stations highlighting hands-on activities for the family to work on together! Drop in.

Crazy 8s Club
Tuesday, February 21, 4:45-5:15 p.m.
Grades K-2
Crazy 8s is a recreational after-school math club that helps kids appreciate the math that’s all around them. Have fun with mischief making activities like Bouncy Dice Explosions, and Toilet Paper Olympics. Some of the activities build from week to week so it is important not to miss a class. Must be able to attend all 8 sessions. Register now.

S’mores Book Club: Harry Potter and Other Fantasies
Wednesday, February 22, 4:15-5 p.m.
Grades 3-5
Do you devour a book like you devour a great after school snack? If so, sign up for the S’mores Book Club! We will eat a snack and talk about a different topic each month. Register now.

Chick-fil-A Storytime
Thursday, February 23, 9:30-10:30 a.m.
All ages, preschoolers with an adult
Storytime at west side Chick-fil-A, 245 N Weber Rd, Bolingbrook. Drop in.

Preschool Activity Time
Friday, February 24, 10-11 a.m.
Ages 2-6 with an adult
Meet your friends and have lots of fun in our carpeted meeting room with many games to play! Drop in.

Monarch Award Pizza Party
Friday, February 24, 2-3 p.m.
Grades K-3

Be there when we reveal the library winner! Must vote for favorite 2017 Monarch Award Nominee in order to register. Voting is only allowed after reading five or more titles. Visit the Children’s Services Desk to vote and register or call 630-685-4181.

Annual Preschool Round-Up and Vision and Hearing Screening
Saturday, February 25, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
All ages
Fountaindale’s 6th Annual Preschool Round-Up is an opportunity to find the preschool that is right for your child. This will be your chance to meet and talk to representatives from more than a dozen preschools and daycare centers in the area to help find the right fit. There will be other community organizations attending as well and drawings for prizes for teachers and parents and activities for the kids! This drop-in event is being held in Meeting Room A. Also, the Will County Health Dept. will be conducting FREE hearing and vision screenings from 11:30am-2:30pm in Meeting Room B as part of Fountaindale’s Preschool Round-Up.

Saturday Special: Drop-in Storytime
Saturday, February 25, 11-11:30 a.m.
All ages, preschoolers with an adult

Stories, songs, and fun are the order of the day when we get together for storytime. Drop in until the limit of the room is reached.

Pete the Cat: I’m reading in my school shoes!
Saturday, February 25, 3-5 p.m.
Grades K-1

Can you read all by yourself? Come in and read a book to us! Students who participate earn a Pete the Cat headband, reading certificate and bookmark! Drop in.

African American History in Poetry

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Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford; illustrated by R. Gregory Christie
As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when at least for half a day they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. Here they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance, and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles, and their oppression. This story chronicles slaves’ duties each day, from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday, and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo Square.
This title received honors as a Caldecott Honor Book and a King Illustrator Honor Book this year.

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Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxanne Orgill; illustrated by Francis Vallejo
When Esquire magazine planned an issue to salute the American jazz scene in 1958, graphic designer Art Kane pitched a crazy idea: how about gathering a group of beloved jazz musicians and photographing them? He didn’t own a good camera, didn’t know if any musicians would show up, and insisted on setting up the shoot in front of a Harlem brownstone. Could he pull it off? In a captivating collection of poems, Roxane Orgill steps into the frame of Harlem 1958, bringing to life the musicians’ mischief and quirks, their memorable style, and the vivacious atmosphere of a Harlem block full of kids on a hot summer’s day. Francis Vallejo’s vibrant, detailed, and wonderfully expressive paintings do loving justice to the larger-than-life quality of jazz musicians of the era. Includes bios of several of the fifty-seven musicians, an author’s note, sources, a bibliography, and a foldout of Art Kane’s famous photograph.

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Let’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin, and Turn It Out! Games, Songs, & Stories from an African American Childhood collected by Patricia C. McKissack; illustrated by Brian Pinkney
Parents and grandparents will delight in sharing this exuberant book with the children in their lives. Here is a songbook, a storybook, a poetry collection, and much more, all rolled into one. Find a partner for hand claps such as “Eenie, Meenie, Sassafreeny,” or form a circle for games like “Little Sally Walker.” Gather as a family to sing well-loved songs like “Amazing Grace” and “Oh, Freedom,” or to read aloud the poetry of such African American luminaries as Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, and Paul Laurence Dunbar. And snuggle down to enjoy classic stories retold by the author, including Aesop’s fables and tales featuring Br’er Rabbit and Anansi the Spider.

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One Last Word: Wisdom from the Harlem Renaissance by Nikki Grimes
In this collection of poetry, Nikki Grimes looks afresh at the poets of the Harlem Renaissance — including voices like Langston Hughes, Georgia Douglas Johnson, and many more writers of importance and resonance from this era — by combining their work with her own original poetry. Using “The Golden Shovel” poetic method, Grimes has written a collection of poetry that is as gorgeous as it is thought-provoking. This special book also includes original artwork in full-color from some of today’s most exciting African American illustrators, who have created pieces of art based on Nikki’s original poems.
Nikki Grimes is the 2017 winner of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her “substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.”

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A Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day by Andrea Davis Pinkney
A celebration of the extraordinary life of Ezra Jack Keats, creator of The Snowy Day. The story of The Snowy Day begins more than one hundred years ago, when Ezra Jack Keats was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. The family were struggling Polish immigrants, and … it was many years before Keats’s greatest dream was realized and he had the opportunity to write and illustrate his own book. For more than two decades, Ezra had kept pinned to his wall a series of photographs of an adorable African American child. In Keats’s hands, the boy morphed into Peter, a boy in a red snowsuit, out enjoying the pristine snow; the book became The Snowy Day, winner of the Caldecott Medal, the first mainstream book to feature an African American child. It was also the first of many books featuring Peter and the children of his — and Keats’s — neighborhood. Andrea Davis Pinkney’s lyrical narrative tells the inspiring story of a boy who pursued a dream, and who, in turn, inspired generations of other dreamers

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You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen by Carole Boston Weatherford; art by Jeffery Boston Weatherford
This history in verse celebrates the story of the Tuskegee Airmen: pioneering African-American pilots who triumphed in the skies and past the color barrier.

African American History Biographies

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Fancy Party Gowns: The Story of Fashion Designer Ann Cole Lowe by Deborah Blumentahl; illustrated by Laura Freeman
A beautiful picture book about Ann Cole Lowe, a little-known African-American fashion designer who battled personal and social adversity in order to pursue her passion of making beautiful gowns and went on to become one of society’s top designers.  (That one to the right of her on the cover? Jackie Kennedy’s wedding dress.)

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Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History by Walter Dean Myers
Frederick Douglass was a self-educated slave in the South who grew up to become an icon. He was a leader of the abolitionist movement, a celebrated writer, an esteemed speaker, and a social reformer, proving that, as he said, “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.”

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The Legendary Miss Lena Horne by Carole Boston Weatherford; illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon
Surveys the life of the actress and civil rights activist, describing her childhood, early years in vaudeville, and achievements as the first African American actress to be offered a studio contract.

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Lift Your Light a Little Higher: The Story of Stephen Bishop, Slave-Explorer by Heather Henson; illustrated by Bryan Collier
The story of Stephen Bishop, a slave and early explorer and guide at Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

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Muhammad Ali: A Champion is Born by Gene Barretta; illustrated by Frank Morrison
Presents a biography of the legendary boxing champion that traces the childhood event that inspired his career and the achievements that became his enduring legacy.

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Preaching to the Chickens by Jabari Asim; illustrated by E.B. Lewis
Critically acclaimed author Jabari Asim and Caldecott Honor-winning illustrator E. B. Lewis give readers a fascinating glimpse into the boyhood of Civil Rights leader John Lewis. John wants to be a preacher when he grows up a leader whose words stir hearts to change, minds to think, and bodies to take action. But why wait? When John is put in charge of the family farm’s flock of chickens, he discovers that they make a wonderful congregation! So he preaches to his flock, and they listen, content under his watchful care, riveted by the rhythm of his voice. Celebrating ingenuity and dreaming big, this inspirational story, featuring Jabari Asim’s stirring prose and E. B. Lewis’s stunning, light-filled impressionistic watercolor paintings, includes an author’s note about John Lewis, who grew up to be a member of the Freedom Riders, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and demonstrator on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, and is now a Georgia congressman.

Love Stories

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Heart to Heart by Lois Ehlert
Alphabet letters and bold, graphic images of fruits and vegetables come together in this book of pun-filled rebuses about love and friendship.

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I Heart You by Meg Fleming; illustrated by Sarah Jane Wright
A rhyming picture book about the loving parent-child relationship in animal and human families

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I Will Love You Anyway by Mick Inkpen; illustrated by Chloe Inkpen
Dog is very badly behaved; he destroys everything, chases cars, rolls in poo, and won’t stop running away! But when he finds himself lost and alone there is one person he knows he can always count on.

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Pete Likes Bunny by Emily Arnold McCully
Pete likes Bunny, the new girl in his class; and despite teasing from classmates, Bunny likes Pete too.

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Psst! I Love You by Marjorie Blain Parker; illustrated by Sydney Hanson
Celebrates the love between parents and children of every species. In lilting rhyme, the book introduces toddlers to an array of super-adorable animal parents and babies, including cows, horses, sheep, cats, owls, ducks, roosters, and, of course humans. What do they all say to each other? I LOVE YOU! This is the perfect read-aloud and goodnight story.

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The Secret Life of Squirrels: A Love Story by Nancy Rose
Mr. Peanuts, a most unusual squirrel, is lonely as Valentine’s Day nears but he meets Rosie in the bookstore and soon they are nuts about each other.

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What Do You Love About You? by Karen Lechelt
Different animals show there is a lot to love about each of us.

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When an Elephant Falls in Love by Davide Cali; illustrations by Alice Lotti
When an elephant falls in love, he does many foolish things, and never tells her how he feels–until one day the doorbell rings.

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XO, OX: A Love Story by Adam Rex; illustrated by Scott Campbell
The hilarious tale of an ox who is in love with a gazelle, told in correspondence