Meet the Magazines

IMG_0830[1]Are you looking for ways to help your children enjoy reading?  Did you know that in addition to books, the library also has magazines for children?  There are children’s versions of popular magazines like National Geographic Kids and Sports Illustrated for Kids, children’s magazines enjoyed for generations like Cricket and Ranger Rick, and new offerings like Disney Junior Magazine.

Nowadays you can even download digital versions of magazines through the Zinio for Libraries app.  The service is free, just like checking out a physical magazine.  The library is even able to offer some titles digitally that we don’t have on the shelf, like Iguana and Spanish language editions of Ask, Babybug, and Ladybug.

The Parents’ Choice Foundation has an online guide to magazines they have recognized with awards.  It provides a nice summary of each magazine’s appeal (and occasionally an evenhanded look at its weaknesses).

 

 

Curious George Day

Curious George at storytime

Curious George Drop-in Storytime

Date: 8/27/2016
Start Time: 11:00 AM
End Time: 11:30 AM

Stories, songs, and fun are the order of the day when we get together in our Storytime Room. This month Curious George will be here! Come meet him in person, hear stories, and have your picture taken with him! Curious George will make a brief appearance during the storytime, courtesy of Barnes & Noble at Bolingbrook Promenade.

Location: Fountaindale Public Library, Meeting Room A

All ages, preschoolers with an adult. Drop in until the limit of the room is reached. Please arrive on time as Curious George will only make a brief appearance. Don’t forget your camera!

Bring Your Own Lunch and Watch a Movie

Date: 8/27/2016
Start Time: 12:00 PM
End Time: 2:00 PM

We will be showing a movie featuring your favorite monkey!  Bring your own lunch to enjoy during the movie. The movie will run for 86 minutes.
Location: Fountaindale Public Library, Meeting Room A
All ages; preschoolers with an adult. Drop in until the room limit of 90 is reached.

Celebrating National Parks

100 years ago (August 25, 1916), the National Park Service was established.  We have some stories to share with you to celebrate!

Ms. Kathy:

Grandparents with the kids at Bryce

We got our first National Parks Passport and completed our first Junior Ranger packet in 1998 while visiting Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, when my children were ages three, four and seven.  From that moment on, we were hooked.  Our travels have taken us from Acadia in Maine, to the Everglades in Florida, to Haleakala in Hawaii, to Denali in Alaska, and so many places in between.  We have enjoyed a snowball fight in July at Glacier National Park in Montana and another at Lassen Volcanic National Park, California and later that day hiked on the icy floors of the lava tubes in Lava Beds National Monument.  We learned about Spanish Colonists in the San Antonio Missions National Park and walked the steps of Pocahontas and John Smith in Jamestown Virginia, Colonial Historic Park. We learned new words like Hoodoo which is a rock formation made famous in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, where we also learned that the bark of a ponderosa pine smells a lot like vanilla when you are up close.   My children are grown now so the vacations are a little different but we did chose to celebrate this 100th anniversary of America’s National Parks by visiting several Parks this year alone.  Most recently I visited Everglades National Park with my two daughters and Fort Sumter National Monument with one daughter and two Aunts.  HAPPY CENTENNIAL TO OUR NATIONAL PARKS SERVICES!

My kids and me at Yellowstone NPS

Ms. Sarah:

moon by night

I never visited the U.S. national parks growing up.  When I think of them, I always think of reading The Moon by Night when I was middle school age and trying to get my hands on all the Madeleine L’Engle I could.  (In this book, Vicky meets nihilistic Zachary for the first time as both their families go camping.  He’s a key character in A Ring of Endless Light, one of my all-time favorites, and for thematic reasons I would recommend both books to anyone who loves The Fault in Our Stars.)

Oddly enough, the one national park I did spend a lot of time in was Canadian: Point Pelee.  Living in the Detroit suburbs, it was only a short drive away.  You didn’t need a passport to enter Canada from the U.S. back then, and this was where my family went when we drove to the beach.  Point Pelee is on the monarch butterfly migration route, and the T-shirts and other souvenirs we would buy always had pictures of the black and orange butterflies.  That childhood connection is why efforts to save the monarch butterfly mean a lot to me.

Ms. Nancy:

nancy pic 1nancy pic 2

It was the Spring of 2005 and I wanted to start planning my family’s summer vacation. I had been to the Grand Canyon as a child but had not been back since. I thought my kids should see the Grand Canyon as it truly is an amazing sight and the only one of the Seven Wonders of the World located in North America. We flew to Arizona and then stayed in Williams, Arizona to ride the Grand Railway train in to the Park to see the Grand Canyon. There was music on the train and we were robbed by [pretend] train robbers on the way to the Canyon. Once to the Grand Canyon we stayed in the park at the Maswik Lodge so, we could really enjoy the Canyon during the day and the evening. I believe this was truly one of our best family vacations!

 

Reading “real” books

Remembering a great writer

August 19 marks the 80th anniversary of the death of poet and playwright Federico García Lorca during the Spanish Civil War.  Here are a few books in Spanish and English for introducing the writer and his work to children:

fgl
Federico García Lorca by Georgina Lázaro León
This picture book biography in Spanish was awarded a Pura Belpré Author Honor in 2010.
Poetic text recounts the childhood of the noted Spanish poet, including his love for the nature and folklore of his native Andalusia, his introduction to music and literature at home, and his health problems.

yo
You’re on! Seven Plays in English and Spanish, selected by Lori Marie Carlson
This selection includes “The girl who waters basil and the very inquisitive prince” in English and “La nina que riega la albahaca y el principe pregunton” in Spanish.

tdpp
Tomie dePaola’s Book of Poems
An illustrated collection of poems by various authors includes “Cancion Tonta” (Silly Song) and “Caracola” (Snail) in both Spanish and English.

fop
A Family of Poems: My Favorite Poetry for Children, selected by Caroline Kennedy
An anthology of poems includes a different interpretation of “Caracola,” titled “Seashell,” in English.

Saturday Special: Family Movie

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Join us for a free movie on Saturday, August 20, at 1:30 p.m. Meeting Room A.  Drop in until the limit of the room is reached. All ages, preschoolers with an adult.

75 years of Lynne Cheney

Former Second Lady Lynne Cheney turns 75 today.  Did you know that she has written a number of books on American history for children?

a abigail
A is for Abigail: An Almanac of Amazing American Women
“Each letter of the alphabet is represented by an important woman in the history of the United States, as well as others in her same field of accomplishment.”

america primer
America: A Patriotic Primer
“Each letter of the alphabet is represented by important people, ideas, and events in the history of the United States.”

time freedom
A Time for Freedom: What Happened When in America
Browse your way through American history with facts, trivia, and quotations.

we people
We the People: The Story of Our Constitution
“In May 1787 delegates from across the country–including George Washington, James Madison, and Benjamin Franklin–gathered in Philadelphia and, meeting over the course of a sweltering summer, created a new framework for governing: the Constitution of the United States.”

when washington
When Washington Crossed the Delaware: A Wintertime Story for Young Patriots
“Best-selling author Lynne Cheney tells the dramatic story of the military campaign that began on Christmas night in 1776.”